Succession


Succession
   The mechanics of the succession to the throne are never indicated in Egyptian sources. It is generally assumed that the eldest son of the king by his queen was the likely successor, but a more ambitious and politically competent son by a minor wife might have proven succesful. This lack of a clear law of succession appears to have led to various harem conspiracies, of which only a few are known. During Dynasty 12, the post of coregent was established whereby the designated successor was crowned as joint king during his father’s lifetime, but even this procedure did not prevent an un successful attempt to dispose of both Amenemhat Iand his coregent, Senusret I, in favor of a rival candidate. During Dynasty19, the post of crown prince, or iry pct, was created, but this too seems to have lapsed during Dynasty 20. It is a curious fact that royal princes are rarely attested during the reigns of their fathers except during the later period of Egyptian history.
   See also Harem Conspiracy Papyri.
Historical Dictionary Of Ancient Egypt by Morris L. Bierbrier

Ancient Egypt. A Reference Guide. . 2011.

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  • succession — [ syksesjɔ̃ ] n. f. • 1200; lat. successio « fait de venir à la place » → succéder I ♦ 1 ♦ Dr. Transmission du patrimoine laissé par une personne décédée (l auteur) à une ou plusieurs personnes vivantes (les ayants cause); manière dont se fait… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • succession — suc·ces·sion /sək se shən/ n 1 a: the order in which or the conditions under which one person after another succeeds to a property, dignity, position, title, or throne the sequence of succession to the presidency b: the right of a person or line… …   Law dictionary

  • SUCCESSION — SUCCESSION, devolution of the deceased person s property on his legal heirs. Order of Succession The Pentateuchal source of the order of succession is If a man die and have no son, then ye shall cause his inheritance to pass unto his daughter.… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Succession — Suc*ces sion, n. [L. successio: cf. F. succession. See {Succeed}.] 1. The act of succeeding, or following after; a following of things in order of time or place, or a series of things so following; sequence; as, a succession of good crops; a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • succession — succession, progression, series, sequence, chain, train, string are comparable when they mean a number of things that follow each other in some order. Succession implies that the units, whether things or persons, follow each other, typically in… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Succession — is the act or process of following in order or sequence. (It is not to be confused with secession, the act of withdrawing from an organization, union, or political entity). Succession may further refer to, within the context of order and sequence …   Wikipedia

  • succession — UK US /səkˈseʃən/ noun ► [S] a number of similar people or events that exist or happen one after another: a succession of sth »The company has been involved in a succession of accounting scandals. »They employ their seasonal workers on a… …   Financial and business terms

  • succession — Succession. s. f. Heredité. Succession directe. succession collaterale. grande, riche succession. succession endettée, embroüillée, onereuse. curateur à la succession vacante. les effets d une succession, il luy est escheu deux successions en un… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • succession — ► NOUN 1) a number of people or things following one after the other. 2) the action, process, or right of inheriting an office, title, etc. 3) Ecology the process by which a plant community successively gives way to another until stability is… …   English terms dictionary

  • succession — [sək sesh′ən] n. [OFr < L successio < succedere: see SUCCEED] 1. the act of succeeding or coming after another in order or sequence or to an office, estate, throne, etc. 2. the right to succeed to an office, estate, etc. 3. a number of… …   English World dictionary

  • succession — early 14c., fact or right of succeeding someone by inheritance, from O.Fr. succession (13c.), from L. successionem (nom. successio) a following after, a coming into another s place, result, from successus, pp. of succedere (see SUCCEED (Cf.… …   Etymology dictionary